Specialist writing – Monge Grafico http://mongegrafico.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 14:40:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mongegrafico.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-150x150.jpg Specialist writing – Monge Grafico http://mongegrafico.com/ 32 32 AM Best confirms credit ratings from the European Nuclear Insurance Mutual Association https://mongegrafico.com/am-best-confirms-credit-ratings-from-the-european-nuclear-insurance-mutual-association/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 14:38:30 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/am-best-confirms-credit-ratings-from-the-european-nuclear-insurance-mutual-association/ Get instant alerts when news breaks on your stocks. Claim your one week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here. AMSTERDAM–(BUSINESS WIRE)– AM Best confirmed the financial strength rating of A (Excellent) and the issuer’s long-term credit rating of “a” (Excellent) from the European Nuclear Insurance Mutual Association (Emani) (Belgium). The outlook for these Credit Ratings […]]]>

Get instant alerts when news breaks on your stocks. Claim your one week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here.


AMSTERDAM–(BUSINESS WIRE)–
AM Best confirmed the financial strength rating of A (Excellent) and the issuer’s long-term credit rating of “a” (Excellent) from the European Nuclear Insurance Mutual Association (Emani) (Belgium). The outlook for these Credit Ratings (ratings) is stable.

The ratings reflect the strength of Emani’s balance sheet, which AM Best assesses as very strong, as well as its strong operating performance, neutral business profile and appropriate management of business risks.

The strength of Emani’s balance sheet is underpinned by a risk-adjusted capitalization at the highest level, as measured by Best’s capital adequacy ratio (BCAR), taking into account the financial flexibility of the mutual supported by its ability to make an additional capital call to its members. In the unlikely event of a total limit loss, there would be a significant depletion of capital due to the large net size of the line offered by Emani to its members relative to its capital base. However, AM Best believes that the mutual’s contractual right to call retroactive premium for six times each member’s annualized premium contribution will allow it to quickly replenish its capital base. AM Best considers the mutual’s reliance on reinsurance to provide significant gross line size to be an offsetting factor in the valuation.

Emani has a track record of strong underwriting performance, demonstrated by an average loss ratio of 24.1% over the five-year period ending in 2021. AM Best expects Emani’s forward-looking performance to be in line at historical norms, although subject to volatility, in line with a claims profile dominated by an infrequent number of low to medium claims.

Emani has an established position in the nuclear power industry, underwriting property and terrorism coverage for nuclear facilities. The mutual provides capacity to more than a third of the nuclear operators in the world, which gives it a leading role in its market. Emani’s position benefits from favorable market conditions, with demand for nuclear coverage expected to remain strong in the medium term. The narrow focus of the mutual and the high risk nature of the business written are considered offsetting factors in the valuation.

This press release relates to credit ratings that have been published on AM Best’s website. For all rating information relating to the release and relevant disclosures, including details of the office responsible for issuing each of the individual ratings referenced in this release, please see AM Best’s Recent Assessment Activity Web page. For more information on the use and limitations of credit rating opinions, please see Best Credit Score Guide. For more information on the proper use of Best’s Credit Scores, Best’s Performance Ratings, Best’s Preliminary Credit Ratings, and AM Best’s press releases, please see Guide to Proper Use of Best’s Ratings and Reviews.

AM Best is a global credit rating agency, news publisher and data analytics provider specializing in the insurance industry. Headquartered in the United States, the company does business in more than 100 countries with regional offices in London, Amsterdam, Dubai, Hong Kong, Singapore and Mexico City. For more information, visit www.ambest.com.

Copyright © 2022 by AM Best Rating Services, Inc. and/or its affiliates. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Giannina Carbajal Ortiz

Financial Analyst

+31 30 308 5428

[email protected]

Christopher Sharkey

Manager, Public Relations

+1 908 439 2200 ext. 5159

[email protected]

Pierre Tournier, FSA, CFA, CERA

Associate Director

+31 20 308 5423

[email protected]

Al Slavin

Communications Specialist

+1 908 439 2200 ext. 5098

[email protected]

Source: AM Best

]]>
Meet a trail champion: Susie Murphy https://mongegrafico.com/meet-a-trail-champion-susie-murphy/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 18:16:01 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/meet-a-trail-champion-susie-murphy/ What is the definition of a trail champion? These chosen few are leaders in their community who have contributed their knowledge, influence and passion to building the best local trails. We celebrate these trail champions through a Q&A style blog series. These local leaders were nominated by members of their communities and agreed to share […]]]>

What is the definition of a trail champion? These chosen few are leaders in their community who have contributed their knowledge, influence and passion to building the best local trails.

We celebrate these trail champions through a Q&A style blog series. These local leaders were nominated by members of their communities and agreed to share their insights into their success.

Meet Trail Champion Susie Murphy, Executive Director of the San Diego Mountain Bike Association.

Susie speaking to young mountain bikers at the 2021 Take a Kid Mountain Bike Day hosted by Sprockids San Diego. Photo courtesy of Sprockids.
IMBA: Tell us about your experience with mountain biking.

Susie: I started mountain biking in the early 1990s to follow my husband who had started biking with our young daughter in a backpack. I just needed to watch them, but we soon discovered a family hobby that took us on many adventures. Some of our best times were camping at Sea Otter, going to races in Baja and out west, and attending 24 hour races with all of our friends. After 10 years of running in various disciplines and volunteering at Cuyamaca Rancho State Park, the trail defense bug has really set in. I love mountain biking because of the people you meet, the good times and the fabulous places you visit. And on top of that, as a San Diegan native, I really love getting to know every nook and cranny of our amazing San Diego County.

IMBA: What partnerships have been most successful for you in creating more trails in your area?

Susie: Southern California is a particularly difficult place to defend trails due to so many land use constraints and the incredible biodiversity and cultural resources of the region. The partnerships that have been most successful for us have come from relationships built over time with land managers who have the experience and passion to develop more recreational opportunities in their areas. We have a great partnership with the Cleveland National Forest, for example. Success also comes when agency staff members can stay in their local post for at least several years so they can really get into projects and management plans. In any agency, a big challenge is when staff members change jobs or locations every couple of years. We’ve had success with the county and city of San Diego as well as smaller local jurisdictions, but either way it’s because a staff member believed in the vision of more trails for San Diego.

IMBA: What advice would you give to communities that want to see more trails near them?

Susie: A top priority is always building relationships with local land managers. Understand who manages your local areas and what their position is on the development of improved recreational trails. Find those rangers or decision makers, including elected officials who are recreation-friendly. Are they hiking, horseback riding or trail running? Take them on an excursion! Next, build trust by starting with small projects. Even cleaning up waste in the area and attracting other stakeholders can go a long way in building trust. Do your homework and always come to the table offering help and solutions. Another important aspect is understanding all of the trail users in your area and knowing what kind of experiences they are looking for and how their needs can be balanced with available resources and land use opportunities. Another top priority is making sure your local trail organization has the help it needs. Do they need board members or volunteers for events and trails? Is there a local planning group or parks and recreation commission that needs a mountain biker at the table? Do you need to start a formal trail organization in your area? Work to find one or more donors who will pay for the formation of a 501c3 nonprofit, then get to work!

Susie working at the SDMBA table at an event. Photo courtesy of José Galaz.
IMBA: What resources have you found most helpful in guiding the trail vision you have for your community?

Susie: We often look to other regions and trail organizations that have been successful in guiding our vision for trails in San Diego County. As SDMBA has grown, we’ve really gotten a lot of great advice from other groups. Working with like-minded nonprofits has helped inform our work, raise funds, and build community and consensus at the same time. As an affiliate member organization of IMBA and the California Mountain Biking Coalition, they are very important as they work on larger trail advocacy efforts at the national and state levels with agencies such as California State Parks and the US Forest Service. The high-level work of these organizations allows us to focus on our local opportunities and challenges while using the resources they provide to strengthen our efforts. Other resources come from our staff and volunteers who bring skills such as mapping, project management, land planning, grant writing, event planning, fundraising and development. , nonprofit management and more.

IMBA: People forget that trails don’t fall from the sky. What support would you like to have at the beginning of this work?

Susie: It’s always amazing to me when I meet people who just don’t understand that trail work is a thing. Even the simple maintenance of the cut is very important to keep the trails pleasant for everyone. When I first got involved in trail defense, I can’t believe how much I didn’t know. So many land managers, so many agencies, so many different rules, regulations and planning processes. I have learned so much and am still learning new things about this process every day. Admittedly, anyone who gets into this game can easily get discouraged. I find most trail defenders I know who have been around a long time to be an equal combination of passion, vision, and stubbornness. If I could wish for more support (when I started or even now after seven years) I wish everyone who believes in the mission of more trails would spread the word to their friends and gather more members and support for local trail organizations.

Susie on horseback at an SDMBA event. Photo courtesy of José Galaz.
IMBA: There is often apprehension around the trails. How did you energize your community around a vision for more trails?

Susie: Trails are very personal to people. Any proposed changes or future plans may encounter opposition. Sometimes the opposition comes from trail users, sometimes from land managers who simply want to keep the status quo and sometimes from certain stakeholders who prefer to see preserved areas without human access. The old adage “You can’t make everyone happy” is one I often use. I believe there needs to be a balance between recreation and conservation in our open spaces, especially in our urban and suburban areas of San Diego County. It is the only realistic way. We try to describe the need for trails for all types of users while keeping mountain biking access front and center. Some people still consider us the new kid on the block. This kind of thinking needs to be debunked so that the pace of trail development can attempt to keep up with the immense need. Like most areas, we need more progressive mountain bike optimized trails while maintaining what already exists. Our work is often wonky and cannot be told in a 15 second tik tok video. But for those with the patience to learn, we try to tell the story of a given trail project with all of its challenges and milestones achieved. The more people we can get to listen to the story, the more they will appreciate the trails and the precious open spaces we have.

IMBA: We know that Trail Champions don’t work alone. Who’s on your team for more trails?

Susie: It definitely takes a village of people to do this job. Our members and donors are truly the most supportive of what we do. We value each of them because we know they truly believe in the value of building relationships and attending meetings where decisions are made…so many meetings! SDMBA currently has three employees and also hires at least one seasonal winter trail specialist. Our staff is versatile and accomplishes a lot for a small team. Of course, the staff is supported by our Board of Directors and other wonderful volunteers who help in so many ways. We also always appreciate people who had the vision to found SDMBA in 1994 and who built the foundation on which we continue to grow. We also value our land management partners, with whom we have worked for many years, who believe in increasing trail opportunities for San Diego County. We also have many loyal corporate sponsors who help support our trail work projects and events.

Susie on horseback at an SDMBA event. Photo courtesy of José Galaz.
]]>
Eliud Kipchoge breaks marathon world record in Berlin https://mongegrafico.com/eliud-kipchoge-breaks-marathon-world-record-in-berlin/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 14:43:48 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/eliud-kipchoge-breaks-marathon-world-record-in-berlin/ “],”renderIntial”:true,”wordCount”:350}”> How many more times will Eliud Kipchoge remind the world that he is the GOAT of the marathon? Every time he puts on his Nike shoes and takes part in a race, it seems like he’s adding to his legacy of being the greatest of all time. The seemingly infallible Kenyan runner broke his […]]]>
“],”renderIntial”:true,”wordCount”:350}”>

How many more times will Eliud Kipchoge remind the world that he is the GOAT of the marathon?

Every time he puts on his Nike shoes and takes part in a race, it seems like he’s adding to his legacy of being the greatest of all time.

The seemingly infallible Kenyan runner broke his own marathon world record on Sunday morning at the Berlin Marathon, clocking an unfathomable 2:01:09 to win the race for the fourth time since 2015 and win his 11th World Marathon Majors race in 13 attempts. . Averaging 4:37 per mile, the 37-year-old slashed exactly half a minute off his previous mark of 2:01:39 set at the same race in 2018.

Conditions in the German capital were ideal for fast races – 52 degrees cold after a night of showers, with no further precipitation and no wind. Some 45,527 runners from 157 countries were registered to take part in the first unrestricted Berlin Marathon since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

Kipchoge again showed his marathon dominance despite a minor challenge from Andamlak Belihu halfway through.

Instead of sticking to the planned schedule of running 60:50 for the first half (4:39 per mile), the lead group ran 14:14 for the first 5km and 28:23 for 10km. They crossed the halfway mark in an unprecedented time of 59:51, a blistering pace of 4:34 per mile. It was clear that Kipchoge was trying to breach the 2 hour barrier which has never been breached in World Athletics compliant competition.

RELATED: Why We Have No Choice But To Root For Eliud Kiphchoge, Marathon King

Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge celebrates after winning the Berlin Marathon on September 25, 2022 in Berlin. (Photo: Tobias Schwarz/Getty)

Besides three Kenyan pacemakers – Moses Koech, Noah Kipkemboi and Philemon Kiplimo – Kipchoge always had Belihu, an Ethiopian half-marathon specialist, hot on his heels. Belihu, who has a career best half marathon of 58:54 but a marathon best of just 2:09:43, looked quite comfortable at tha

But an upheaval was not in preparation. Kiplimo was the last pacemaker to stay with Kipchoge and he clocked 25km in 1:11:08 before immediately exiting the course. Kipchoge went forward and quickly dropped Belihu. In a familiar scene from marathons past, it was just Kipchoge against the clock. He managed to keep his pace under three minutes per kilometer, but with split times like 2:57 for the 27th kilometer and 2:59 for the 28th, the “sub-2:00” attempt was called off. He was starting to tire.

“We went too fast,” Kipchoge admitted after the race in his broadcast interview. “It actually takes energy from the muscles.”

Although his pace dropped – he slowed to 3:08 kilometers in the 38th and 3:11 in the 40th – he pulled himself together in the final 2.195 kilometers to lock in his new world athletics record. The men’s world record has now been set eight times in a row in Berlin, a race known for its flat course and pacemakers.

Kipchoge won Sunday’s race over Kenyan Mark Korir (2:05:58), by almost five minutes, and won the equivalent of around $106,000 in prize money and time bonuses. He was given a Kenyan flag and celebrated at the finish area to the delight of thousands of fans.

His second-half lap time was 1:01:19, meaning that although he slowed down a bit, he still averaged 4:41 per mile for the back half of the race. .

“My legs and my body still feel young,” Kipchoge said. “But the most important thing is my spirit, and that also makes me feel fresh and young. I thought, let me try for 2 hours flat. I’m so happy to break the world record.

Eliud Kipchoge
Eliud Kipchoge celebrates a record-breaking day on the streets of Berlin. (Photo: Abdulhamid Hosbas/Getty)

The two-time Olympic champion became the first athlete to run a marathon distance in under 2 hours in Vienna in a time trial in 2019 when he clocked a stunning time of 1:59:40. But this mark was not recognized as an official world record because it was established with a team of rotary pacemakers and not in open competition. Earlier in his career, Kipchoge won a world championship title in the 5,000m on the track.

Since switching to the 26.2-mile distance in 2013, Kipchoge has won 15 of the 17 marathons he has entered. This includes victories at the 2016 and 2020 Olympics, as well as four victories each in Berlin and London. The only flaws in his record are a second place in Berlin in 2013 (2:04:05) and an eighth place in London in 2020 (2:06:49).

RELATED: How Mere Mortals Can Run Like Eliud Kipchoge

Belihu had to settle for fourth place and a new personal best of 2:06:40. He was passed by another Ethiopian, Tadu Abate, who finished third in 2:06:28. Kenyan Abel Kipchumba took fifth place in 2:06:49. Overall, the top 12 men broke 2:10.

Tigiste Assefa Eliud Kipchoge
Men’s race winner Eliud Kipchoge (R) of Kenya and women’s race winner Tigist Assefa of Ethiopia pose on the podium after the Berlin Marathon on September 25, 2022 in Berlin.

If Kipchoge hadn’t broken the world record, the women’s race would have been the big story. Ethiopian Tigist Assefa, an 800m runner in 1:59.24 who competed at the 2016 Rio Olympics, slashed her previous personal best by nearly 20 minutes and ran a sensational time of 2:15:37.

This made her the third fastest woman in history behind only Kenyan Brigid Kosgei (2:14:04) and Britain’s Paula Radcliffe (2:15:25). She erased the Berlin course record of 2:18:11 set by Kenya’s Gladys Cherono in 2018, the same year Kipchoge broke her previous world record.

RELATED: Ethiopia’s Tigist Assefa Claims Berlin Victory, D’Amato Finishes 6th

]]>
Two young researchers describe two new scorpions https://mongegrafico.com/two-young-researchers-describe-two-new-scorpions/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 23:55:33 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/two-young-researchers-describe-two-new-scorpions/ Just another day on the playa. The sun beats down relentlessly. Terracotta emits heat from below. And a scorpion lies, nestled in one of the cracks in the salty, clay-rich soil. Its waxy, caramel-colored exoskeleton, covered in fine sensory hairs, protects it from drying out, and its pectins – the comb-like chemosensory organs on its […]]]>

Just another day on the playa. The sun beats down relentlessly. Terracotta emits heat from below. And a scorpion lies, nestled in one of the cracks in the salty, clay-rich soil. Its waxy, caramel-colored exoskeleton, covered in fine sensory hairs, protects it from drying out, and its pectins – the comb-like chemosensory organs on its belly – taste the ground below.

Unbeknownst to this eight-legged arachnid, it has just been given a new name: Paruroctonus conclusus. Its species epithet, conclusive, is Latin for “restricted” and reflects how extremely small the strip of land near Lake Koehn in Kern County it appears to inhabit. To our knowledge, the entire species lives on less than one square kilometer.

As of August 2022, this species and another Mojave Desert relative of the same genus, P. soda, have been named and formally described in a research paper in Zookeys written by two young naturalists, 18-year-old Prakrit Jain and 19-year-old Harper Forbes, along with Lauren Esposito, curator of arachnology at the California Academy of Science.

From left to right, Prakrit Jain, Harper Forbes and Lauren Esposito. (Photo by Gayle Laird/California Academy of Sciences)

“I didn’t think finding a new species was a very achievable goal,” Forbes said. “I thought it was something that would come much later in life – sort of out of my league, so to speak.”

Their item was years in the making.

It all started in 2011, when Cal Academy arachnologist Sarah Crews observed a mysterious scorpion near Lake Koehn. Crews downloaded the image of this scorpion in 2013 for iNaturalist, a website where people share their sightings and identify species collaboratively. It sat there for years, accumulating line after line of identifications suggested by other iNaturalist users. With each passing year, the “Activity” section for this sighting looked more like a shopping list after a grocery run, with each suggested species crossed out.

When Crews uploaded the sighting in 2013, Jain and Forbes were both around 10 years old. But they were already well on their way to becoming expert California naturalists.

Jain grew up attending bioblitzes, events dedicated to species identification and exploration, and it was during a Mount Diablo bioblitz that Jain encountered his first scorpion, a western forest scorpion. – which, incidentally, was found by iNaturalist co-founder Kenichi Ueda. Forbes met his first scorpion at the Death Valley Visitor Center, and the two have continued to cultivate their interest in the creepy critters of the world ever since those encounters (see Harper’s and from Prakrit Instagrams for cutting edge creepy crawling content).

Jain met Esposito during a bioblitz when he was around 11 years old, and in 2018 Jain and Forbes first met as volunteers at the McClellan Ranch Preserve in Cupertino. They lived only five minutes apart and they spent hours together photographing Forbes’ collection of live scorpions.

“We got to know each other from the scorpions, but we were also interested in all kinds of different animals,” Forbes said. “We kind of refined the scorpions over time.”

At this point, Forbes and Jain are power users of iNaturalist, having each provided over 20,000 IDs each on the platform. They came across Crews’ still-unidentified scorpion sighting in 2011 from Lake Koehn while reading the site in 2019. Recognizing something unusual, the two, along with Esposito, began the collecting process and eventually description of this first new species. In 2021 they added a second one, P. sodaafter finding another unidentified scorpion observation On the platform.

“These students had the motivation, but more importantly, they had this curiosity,” said Zia Nisani, a biology professor at Antelope Valley College and a scorpion behavior expert who studies another scorpion in the Paruroctone gender. “I bet you they weren’t the only two people who watched these two [iNaturalist observations]but they were the first to take it to the next level which led to the publication of the identification of new species.

For young researchers, taking it to the next level meant dividing their time between Cal Academy’s microscopes and the UV blacklights they used to search for scorpions in the Mojave Desert near Lake Koehn for P. conclusus and near Soda Lake for P. soda. After collecting enough representatives of both species, they brought them back to the Cal Academy, where they spent hours poring over the specimens – describing them in detail, taking meticulous measurements of the scorpion’s body parts, writing comparisons between these new species and closely related species. , and taking high quality Pictures for use in paper.

Want even more Bay Area nature stories? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter!

In August 2022, the document was finally published. The question of the Crews sighting in 2013 was finally answered – it was representative of the P. conclusus species. At the time of the article’s publication, Forbes and Jain were high school students.

“When I saw how young these two were, wow, it’s pretty amazing,” Nisani said. “I shared it with my students…You might be the next person to find something…I don’t care if it’s in the sky, at the bottom of the ocean, or in your deserted backyard – there is something to discover, as these children did.

And for scorpions, it turns out there’s still a lot to discover.

“If you look at most vertebrate groups, like mammals or birds, there are probably more researchers studying them than there are species,” Esposito said. For scorpions, she says, “maybe around 15 people in the world are studying scorpions — and there are 2,700 species and counting.”

According to Esposito, scorpion research is currently in its “discovery phase”.

“Most of the work that is still being done is still trying to understand what species exist in the world and how they fit into the larger scorpion tree of life,” Esposito said. “The kind of really detailed information about what scorpions are doing in their environment hasn’t been done yet.” And, she added, that’s true “for virtually every invertebrate species on Earth.”

Much of the current research on scorpions, Nisani said, is aimed at finding medical uses for the venom of certain species. Nisani and Esposito are two researchers who focus instead on understanding the behavior and evolution of scorpions, respectively.

A scorpion is a mystery wrapped in an exoskeleton. These spiky-tailed arachnids have been around for 400 million years, even longer than the first dinosaurs, and they exist in a wide range of habitats, and on every continent except Antarctica. Scorpions are nocturnal, they glow in the dark under UV light (and, by the way, we don’t know why), and they probably practice cannibalism from time to time.

But they have a soft, tender side too.

“Scorpion mothers are very caring for their young, compared to most other invertebrates,” Jain said. Scorpions give birth to “litters” of live young. After birth, the young “scorplings”, as they are called, cling to their mother for a few weeks, like a small army of miniature adults, riding on their mother’s back like a baby opossum. .

Among invertebrates, scorpions are the top dog in the food web. But in a larger scheme, many vertebrates, including some bats, view scorpions as delicious snacks.

The two species described by Jain and Forbes are unique due to their specific alkaline lakebed ecology and highly restricted range. Additionally, according to the Zookeys article, these two species can be differentiated from the others. Paruroctone by, among other features, “deeply scalloped pedipalp toes in males, specific fuscous pigmentation patterns, unique setal counts, and unique morphometric ratios”. Translation: details about claws, coloring, number of hairs and defined body proportions P. soda and P. conclusus apart from related species.

P. soda, found in San Luis Obispo County near Soda Lake, is also one of the largest species in the Paruroctone gender, and P. conclusus is lighter in color and relatively small compared to other alkaline sinks Paruroctone.

The habitats where these species are found are easily overlooked as dry lakebed areas of little ecological significance. These are often privileged places of development.

Whereas P. sodas is protected as part of the Carrizo Plain National Monument, which is a few hours northwest of Los Angeles, P. conclususThe range of is not protected at all – which is of concern to Jain and Forbes, given its limited size and the threats it faces, from urban development in nearby areas like Fremont Valley to the settlement of solar farms.

P. conclususThe small range of could be easily wiped out.

“It’s all or nothing,” Forbes said. “The main concern for this specific scorpion is development. I’ve been through this area many times, often with Prakrit, and every time you pass through there, the California City area, there are new solar panel farms in construction… This scorpion, I think, is pretty much a lot of good to do if nothing is built on it,” he said. “But if something is built on it, then they will, most likely, disappear.”

By writing the full description of the species, Jain and Harper are setting the stage for more formal population assessments to come. They were recently certified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature to do just that. Such assessments could lead to the protection of habitats – and, ultimately, species.

Admittedly, it can be difficult for some to feel excited about other scorpions walking around. However, it is useful to remember that the success of the scorpion is linked to something much bigger than P. conclusus, P. soda, or even their entire gender. As Esposito explains, “healthy, stable ecosystems provide ecosystem services that keep humans alive, and healthy, stable ecosystems are made up of many different species that have evolved together over time to create these stable bonds in life. ‘ecosystem”. Scorpios are entrenched in this web of connectedness and interdependence.

“The very fact that there is a distinct species of scorpion living in this environment means there is something very special about it,” Jain said. “There are probably a lot of other things that are special about this habitat besides this scorpion.” As chilling as they may be, scorpions play a role in the ecosystems that keep us all alive, so remember that the next time you come across an unexpected guest on your desert trip, or even in your slipper .

]]>
Health care is collapsing: British Columbia specialists write letter to Adrian Dix https://mongegrafico.com/health-care-is-collapsing-british-columbia-specialists-write-letter-to-adrian-dix/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 01:04:20 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/health-care-is-collapsing-british-columbia-specialists-write-letter-to-adrian-dix/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News Local health Health Caregivers and medical specialists say their patients are dying on waiting lists due to delays exacerbated by the pandemic Health Minister Adrian Dix at the UBCM annual conference in Whistler on September 13, 2022. Photo by Scott McAlpine /UBCM Content of the article A group of more […]]]>

Caregivers and medical specialists say their patients are dying on waiting lists due to delays exacerbated by the pandemic

Content of the article

A group of more than two dozen medical specialists ripped into Health Minister Adrian Dix in an open letter, complaining that their patients are suffering and dying on worsening waiting lists.

Advertisement 2

Content of the article

The 26 medical specialists – led by Cassandra Lane Dielwart, an orthopedic surgeon in Kelowna and head of the specialty’s association in British Columbia – say the province’s ‘crumbled’ healthcare system is failing patients, including one million are on waiting lists that are only getting worse.

Content of the article

In a call from Kelowna General Hospital on Wednesday, Dielwart said the public appeal arose from failed attempts to speak to Dix and the Department of Health about the issue in March.

“Unfortunately, we got nowhere and it felt like banging my head against a wall,” said Dielwart, who said he has since spoken to specialists in many fields beyond the orthopedics and realized that “every specialty goes through its own crisis.”

Advertisement 3

Content of the article

The open letter seemed necessary because “these stories are common and complex and we really need to get this information out there.”

Dielwart realizes that the crisis is multiple and long before the COVID-19 pandemic – and that money is not the only solution.

“What I see is that all aspects of health care are intertwined,” Dielwart said. “I rely on all these people (radiologists, nurses, family doctors) to even get the person to see me.

“Money is always a factor in public health care, but we have to spend it properly. We need to figure out what’s broken and fix it rather than wasting money. »

Orthopedic surgeon Cassandra Lane Dielwart, left, treats a patient at Kelowna General Hospital in a file photo.
Orthopedic surgeon Cassandra Lane Dielwart, left, treats a patient at Kelowna General Hospital in a file photo. Photo by submitted

In the letter distributed Wednesday, the group calls on Dix to hold an urgent meeting and work cooperatively with the specialists to find solutions.

Advertisement 4

Content of the article

“Our entire healthcare system is collapsing, but not enough is being done to improve outcomes for specialist patients or shorten our overcrowded waiting lists,” writes the group, which includes cardiologists, pediatricians, transplant surgeons and many other specialties.

“If we don’t work together to find solutions, specialty care in this province will further erode.

The letter notes that the persistent challenges of recent years, compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic, mean that “patients are getting sicker and dying on our waiting lists.”

Despite the efforts of primary care providers, the letter says “urgent primary care centers and emergency departments are overwhelmed and cannot provide immediate access to specialists” – and the problem is not limited to delays in surgeries.

Advertisement 5

Content of the article

“Long surgical wait times are the most well-known, but the wait times crisis extends across the spectrum of specialty care,” it reads, offering a few examples among “hundreds, if not thousands.” similar stories:

• A patient with sudden hearing loss who suffers from permanent hearing loss because he has been forced to wait.

• Over 16,000 people waiting for echocardiograms at Vancouver Coastal Health alone.

• Patients in Metro Vancouver and Vancouver Island wait two to three months for an oncologist to see them after a cancer diagnosis.

• A Northern Health respirologist, the only one in her area, has been forced to close her practice to new patients for the past two years as she catches up.

• And patients “wait for weeks with bated breath for their lab results and surgical pathology because of the long backlogs in our labs.”

Advertising 6

Content of the article

Specialists say they write on behalf of patients, many of whom “are often too ill to defend themselves. We need to stabilize and strengthen our specialized care infrastructure to support this vulnerable population.

Doctors say they are ‘exhausted and demoralized’ as they watch specialist care continue to decline.

“It is heartbreaking not to be able to provide the specialized care that BC patients need and deserve. We urgently request a meeting with you, and it is not a word we use lightly.

“We just want a seat at the table,” Dielwart pointed out. “We are fighting top to bottom in health care.”

Postmedia has contacted Health Minister Adrian Dix for an answer.

For more health news and content about diseases, conditions, wellness, healthy lifestyles, medications, treatments and more, go to Health.ca – member of the Postmedia network.

Advertisement 1

comments

Postmedia is committed to maintaining a lively yet civil discussion forum and encourages all readers to share their views on our articles. Comments can take up to an hour to be moderated before appearing on the site. We ask that you keep your comments relevant and respectful. We have enabled email notifications. You will now receive an email if you receive a reply to your comment, if there is an update to a comment thread you follow, or if a user follows you comments. Visit our Community Rules for more information and details on how to adjust your E-mail settings.

]]>
See photos of Priyanka Chopra from Baby Malti in New York for the first time https://mongegrafico.com/see-photos-of-priyanka-chopra-from-baby-malti-in-new-york-for-the-first-time/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 18:37:58 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/see-photos-of-priyanka-chopra-from-baby-malti-in-new-york-for-the-first-time/ Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas’ granddaughter, Malti Marie Chopra Jonas, reached a milestone this week by visiting New York for the first time. Chopra shared a photo of her and Malti looking out the window at the city. The actress captioned it, “Our first trip to the big 🍎😍🧿” Malti was born in January via […]]]>

Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas’ granddaughter, Malti Marie Chopra Jonas, reached a milestone this week by visiting New York for the first time. Chopra shared a photo of her and Malti looking out the window at the city. The actress captioned it, “Our first trip to the big 🍎😍🧿

Malti was born in January via surrogate, but prematurely. Malti spent over 100 days in NICU before returning home with Jonas and Chopra in May. Chopra reflected on this difficult time, writing on Mother’s Day:

On this Mother’s Day, we can’t help but reflect on the past few months and the roller coaster that we’ve been through, that we’re experiencing now, that so many people have also been through. After more than 100 days in the NICU, our baby girl is finally home. Each family’s journey is unique and requires a certain level of faith, and although ours has been a difficult few months, what becomes very clear in retrospect is how precious and perfect each moment is. We are thrilled that our baby girl is finally home and we just want to thank all of the doctors, nurses and specialists at Rady Children’s La Jolla and Cedar Sinai, Los Angeles who have been there selflessly every step of the way. Our next chapter begins now, and our baby is truly a badass. Let’s go MM! Mom and dad love you.

Happy Mother’s Day to all the mothers and caregivers in my life and out there. You make it look so easy. Thanks.

Also… there’s no one I’d rather do this with than you. Thanks for making me a mom @nickjonas i love you ❤

]]>
These Latinas helped start 5,000 Utah small businesses, most of them minority-owned https://mongegrafico.com/these-latinas-helped-start-5000-utah-small-businesses-most-of-them-minority-owned/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 01:15:41 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/these-latinas-helped-start-5000-utah-small-businesses-most-of-them-minority-owned/ Silvia Castro, president and CEO of the Suazo Business Center, left, and the center’s founder, Gladys Gonzalez. Through their work with the Suazo Business Center, the two women have helped approximately 5,000 small businesses in Utah. (Courtesy of Silvia Castro and Gladys Gonzalez) Estimated reading time: 8-9 minutes WEST VALLEY — The Suazo Business Center […]]]>

Silvia Castro, president and CEO of the Suazo Business Center, left, and the center’s founder, Gladys Gonzalez. Through their work with the Suazo Business Center, the two women have helped approximately 5,000 small businesses in Utah. (Courtesy of Silvia Castro and Gladys Gonzalez)

Estimated reading time: 8-9 minutes

WEST VALLEY — The Suazo Business Center has launched about 5,000 Utah small businesses over the past two decades, about 93 percent of which are minority-owned.

Two women are behind this success: the centre’s founder, Gladys Gonzalez, and its current president and CEO, Silvia Castro.

The women, both immigrants from South America, know firsthand the challenges first-generation immigrants face when it comes to “succeeding” in the United States. They have used these experiences to provide multilingual and culturally relevant business advice to entrepreneurs across the state. .

“The whole concept of I want people who look like me, talk like me, and understand me to help me out,” Castro said. “One of the amazing things about the work we do at Suazo is that we can change not only that person’s life, but the life of their family…we can actually change the economic trajectory of an entire family. .”

Facilitate the path of others

Gonzalez was well into an established career when domestic terrorism forced her to immigrate to Utah from Bogota, Colombia in 1991.

Drug traffickers angered by extradition of Colombian suspect to US and US pledge to send aid to help Colombian government fight drug cartels intensified a campaign of terror. Gonzalez said the traffickers threatened that for every drug trafficker extradited to the United States, seven Americans or people who worked for them would be killed.

As an executive at a US bank, Gonzalez felt like he had a target on his back. The bank chief fled the country almost immediately, while Gonzalez and other staff began working from a secure apartment with motorcade escorts to and from work.

“It was a very scary time for my family, my children, for myself,” she said. “It was a horrible time because bombs were exploding everywhere.”

Her bank offered to move her to Log Angeles, New York or Miami, but Gonzalez didn’t feel safe moving to a big city. Instead, she moved to Utah, which she had previously visited because of her faith in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She expected to find a job in a bank, but she was turned down several times. His degree, his ability to write, read and speak English, his banking background and his experience as a diplomat meant next to nothing to employers in the United States.

Gonzalez went from working in one of Bogota’s most important buildings, using a personal driver and two cleaners, to three low-paying jobs to get by: security guard, newspaper delivery and office cleaning.

“For me, cleaning the floors of banks and all of that has been a school of learning because I learned to appreciate how hard people have to fight when they arrive as immigrants,” he said. she stated. “I had to start from scratch to earn a living in the United States”

Despite this obstacle, Gonzalez soon launched Mundo Hispano, which became Utah’s largest Spanish-language newspaper and was eventually acquired by KSL. During the paper’s early years, Gonzalez and her daughter, Sandra Gonzalez, made up the staff. The duo juggled everything from writing and editing to designing and delivering the paper, while continuing to work full time.

Gladys Gonzalez, left, poses for a photo with her mother, Carmen Ramirez, and daughter, Sandra Gonzalez, over Thanksgiving weekend 2021. The trio live together in Texas.
Gladys Gonzalez, left, poses for a photo with her mother, Carmen Ramirez, and daughter, Sandra Gonzalez, over Thanksgiving weekend 2021. The trio live together in Texas. (Photo: Sandra González)

At one point, low on cash, Gonzalez thought she should close the paper. She went to Senator Pete Suazo to tell him the news. The senator was adamant that Gonzalez could not shut down what he told him was the voice of the Hispanic community.

Suazo helped Gonzalez secure a $10,000 microenterprise loan, enough to run the newspaper. In 2009, the newspaper’s readership grew to around 35,000 and it had seven freelance editors, as well as a correspondent in Mexico City and another in Colombia.

“It’s not in circulation today, but it’s what allowed me to live the American dream,” said Gonzalez, who has also owned several businesses, including an advertising agency and a flipping firm. Of house. “The newspaper didn’t give me any money because all my money was already invested, but it gave me visibility and helped me achieve other goals that I had.”

One of those goals was to open a business center that could help individuals the same way Suazo helped her. In 2001, after Suazo died in an ATV accident, Gonzalez founded the Suazo Business Center. His vision for the center was to “bring together all the things we need to learn from American culture and the good things we have to offer the American community”.

“We Latinos have an entrepreneurial spirit; it comes naturally to us,” she said. “My advice would be not to believe that you are inferior to anyone else. You can go as high as you want. You can achieve your dreams as long as you believe in them and take action.”

Building on success

While Gonzalez was building a newspaper, Castro was going through the American school system.

Her family moved from Ecuador to Utah in the early 90s, when she was 14, in an effort to ensure that she and her sisters had a better education and, eventually, better opportunities. to be financially secure adults.

Adjusting to “a whole new whole” hasn’t been easy. Castro’s saving grace was that she and her two sisters were thrown into college life together. They took the most advanced Spanish course offered by their school – a small break each day from what Castro called a completely alien education system.

“I quickly realized it was kind of self-motivated,” she said. “It was very fascinating to start. And that’s what I understood, that there are a lot of systems here in this country that are autonomous. … So that was one of my first lessons to move here and be a teenager.”

Silvia Castro poses for a photo at the age of 6.  Castro moved from Ecuador to Utah with his family when he was 14 years old.
Silvia Castro poses for a photo at the age of 6. Castro moved to Utah from Ecuador with his family when he was 14 years old. (Photo: courtesy of Silvia Castro)

This lesson would serve her well as she navigated school and eventually her career. From a young age, Castro knew she wanted to be in business. She made sure to take college-level economics and finance classes in high school and participated in the business and finance clubs Kearns High School had to offer. When she started at Westminster College, Castro said she was eager to graduate and start her career. She earned a degree in international business in three years despite working full time.

“I was a woman on a mission,” she said. “But looking back, I wish someone had told me to enjoy it a bit more and get to know my peers a bit better – because sometimes education isn’t just about papers or school attendance; it’s about the people who are literally sitting next to you Let’s be honest, the people who are sitting next to you will probably have a say in where your jobs will be for the next few decades, because everything revolves around networks.

It’s one of the things that, as the first in her family to attend an American university, Castro said she just didn’t know.

His first job out of college was as an international trade specialist with the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce. In this position, she helped small businesses learn how to import and export products. The love she developed for small business during that first job has remained, even as Castro’s career spanned government positions, including director of Hispanic Latin American affairs for two governors of the United States. Utah, nonprofits like the Goldman Sachs 10K Small Business program, and working with executives and business owners from Fortune 500 companies.

Castro was working for the Salt Lake City Department of Economic Development when his current position opened up at the Suazo Business Center. She said something inside her told her she had to go get the job.

“I loved what (Gonzalez) was trying to create with that cross,” Castro said. “I just felt they had done this incredible job, but at the same time they could do more.”

She had two initial goals: to create an agenda for women to address the unique challenges they face and to push businesses to grow in traditional markets.

“As long as our customers only saw Latinos as their customers, they would always stay small,” she said.

In his five years with the center, however, Castro achieved those goals and more. The center opened a second site in Ogden, more than tripled its staff, quintupled its budget and significantly increased its reserves.

She said the hardest thing she had to overcome to get to where she is today is low expectations – something she said is “just part of the experience of minority”.

“As a Latina, I’ll have to work three times as hard to get equal recognition. Yet there’s always that low expectation,” she said. “There’s always those low expectations when people are incredibly capable. If you just give them a chance, they’ll surprise you. But those low expectations are always there. And frankly, I think that’s why we’re so successful. , because at Suazo , there is no place for low expectations.”

To be involved

The Suazo Business Center offers basic, intermediate and advanced courses for entrepreneurs as well as counseling appointments in several languages. The center also offers assistance in applying for small business loans as well as in-house micro loans for those not eligible for traditional financing.

For more information about the center, visit suazocenter.org.

Correction: A previous version incorrectly identified Silvia Castro as the executive director of the Suazo Center; she is CEO and President.

The Most Recent Utah Voces Stories

Sydnee Gonzalez is a multicultural reporter for KSL.com covering the diversity of Utah people and communities. Dressed Spanish. You can find Sydnee at @sydnee_gonzalez on Twitter.

More stories that might interest you

]]>
Cast, Plot, Release, News and Returns, and More https://mongegrafico.com/cast-plot-release-news-and-returns-and-more/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 15:41:27 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/cast-plot-release-news-and-returns-and-more/ Picture via Paramount Plus The much-discussed video game adaptation Halo returns for season two and promises more action and deeper stories. In season one, John-117/Master Chief (Pablo Schreiber) and his Spartans battled the Covenant, violent aliens who terrorize civilizations like the Insurgent Outpost on the planet Madrigal. The only survivor of this attack is a […]]]>

Picture via Paramount Plus

The much-discussed video game adaptation Halo returns for season two and promises more action and deeper stories. In season one, John-117/Master Chief (Pablo Schreiber) and his Spartans battled the Covenant, violent aliens who terrorize civilizations like the Insurgent Outpost on the planet Madrigal. The only survivor of this attack is a teenager named Kwan Ha (Yerin Ha) who gets caught in the middle of the conflict and tests Master Chief in a way he doesn’t expect.

The show received a lot of backlash due to changes to the source material and Master Chief removing his helmet, which his video game counterpart did not. Executive producer Kiki Wolfkill and Schreiber supported the decision, believing it was important to make the change to show the full range of Master Chief’s emotions. The show was Paramount Plus’ most expensive to date, and the success of the series is of the utmost importance to the streaming service.

Here’s what we know about Halo the new and returning cast of season two, plot, release date, and more.

Halo season two new cast and return

The show’s official Twitter account made the Halo the announcement of the start of production on season 2 and the confirmation of filming on location in Iceland. Pictured, of course, are Schreiber as Master Chief, Natasha Culzac as Rice, Bentley Kalu as Vannak, and Kate Kennedy as Kai.

Other cast members include the enigmatic Dr. Halsey played by McElhone, Bokeem Woodbine as Soren-066, Shabana Azmi as Admiral Margaret Parangosky, Olive Gray as Miranda Keyes, Yerin Ha, Charlie Murphy and Danny Sapani as Captain Jacob Keyes. Series regulars are Tylan Bailey as Kessler and Fiona O’Shaughnessy as Laera.

New to the cast is Joseph Morgan (The Vampire Diaries, The originals) as James Ackerson, a career-focused United Nations Space Command (UNSC) intelligence officer, and Cristina Rodlo (no one comes out alive) will play Talia Perez, a rookie linguistics specialist.

Halo Season 2 Plot

Early in the series, Master Chief ventures into a cave system and finds a Forerunner Keystone. He touches him and mysterious symbols unlock his childhood memories (the ones from the Spartan program had their memories erased so that’s a big deal). His mind begins to open and he questions his superiors and the inner workings of his job. As he and the Spartans battle the Covenant, he must also fight for the truth and decide who to trust when Makee (Charlie Murphy), a Covenant-raised human is found who shares John’s proclivity for visions.

The Season 1 finale set up major events for Season 2. Over the course of the series, John finds out that Dr. Catherine Halsey (Natascha McElhone) is the one who kidnapped children for the Spartan super-soldier program and experimented with them for UNSC use. In the finale, John has broken free from his programming and his silver team travels to the planet Hesduros to find Makee who has stolen a mysterious artifact from Madrigal and an artifact from Eridanus II, John’s home planet.

In the climactic battle with the Covenant, the Silver Team is overwhelmed and John must rely on his artificial intelligence Cortana (Jen Taylor) to take control of him. With Cortana’s help, he fights them off and they are able to secure the artifacts. However, her decision could come at the expense of John’s personality. He’s been fighting to break free this whole time, but season two could see a Master Chief that’s more mechanical than human.

In the final battle, Makee activated keystones which generated an explosion and saved Master Chief. Consequently, a star map was generated that would lead to Halo (these are ancient artifacts created by the fallen star empire known as the Forerunners), but Master Chief was locked in stasis. Logically, this thread will continue when the story picks up in season two and another confrontation with Makee, with whom he has developed a romantic relationship, is inevitable. Schreiber said in an interview with Deadline this season two would be a “very serious” take on warfare, and they’re aiming for “authenticity” above all else.

Halo season two changes

The showrunner will change in halo season 2 from duo Kyle Killen and Steven Kane to Dave Wiener. Schreiber shared what to expect from the new showrunner, noting that the most important thing for him is the writing and the material. He feels the written material is being taken to new and exciting places and he is ready to get back to work with his new collaborators. McElhone said many lessons were learned in season one, and many changes and improvements were made for season two.

Halo season two will be released sometime in 2023. It’s likely to arrive around the same time Halo the first season premiered in 2022, which would be in the spring, but the official date will be confirmed once announced.

]]>
The Asgardr Report – 13th Edition: August 2022 | Fire Emblem Heroes Wiki https://mongegrafico.com/the-asgardr-report-13th-edition-august-2022-fire-emblem-heroes-wiki/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 23:32:16 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/the-asgardr-report-13th-edition-august-2022-fire-emblem-heroes-wiki/ The reason this Asgardr report was delayed stems mostly from CYL4 refinements, as Choose Your Legends unit refinements tend to be pretty meta-final. This year was no exception, as all four upgrades are relatively useful for the most part. In this section, we’ll provide a quick overview of the improvements and analyze how things have […]]]>

The reason this Asgardr report was delayed stems mostly from CYL4 refinements, as Choose Your Legends unit refinements tend to be pretty meta-final. This year was no exception, as all four upgrades are relatively useful for the most part. In this section, we’ll provide a quick overview of the improvements and analyze how things have changed for these units.

Brave Edelgard

Prior to its refinement, Edelgard was still one of the most mobile armors with the added movement of Flower Hauteclere alongside a pseudo-acrobatic effect. This is useful because the usual mobility choice is Passive C, which is usually picked up by save skills. However, since Edelgard’s durability isn’t the best, it’s slowly being squeezed out of the meta, only seeing a slight resurgence due to the introduction of Stout Ax as it synergizes with the rule of l black eagle by providing first hit damage reduction. .

Flower Hauteclere continues to provide Edelgard with the extra movement and provides Edelgard with even more stats to work with. The stats can also be used in the Player Phase, meaning she is probably one of the most impactful backup units in the Player Phase while still retaining the ability to warp and provide savior support to his allies. Although the weapon provides healing on hit, it can be difficult for Edelgard to use Far Save due to Valentine’s Chrom prominence, which not using Svalinn Shield is most likely a death sentence.

In short, Brave Edelgard’s game plan remains the same for most game modes; she’s still a great Near Save unit in Aether Raids Offense, and in Summoner Duels she’s probably useful for a team that lacks mobility support like Bridal Catria and Ash, her best use probably being Svalinn Shield to protect against a unit Armor Effective such as Valentine’s Chrom, Brave Eirika, Valentine’s Chrom, Brave Chrom, and did I mention Valentine’s Chrom?

Brave Lysithea

Brave Lysithea has been criticized for her lack of self-configuration, as she struggles to find a way to activate her weapon’s HP condition herself. The developers tried to fix it by introducing Winter Bernadetta to do 1 damage, but instead of Brave Lysithea gaining prominence, it instead led to frequent use of HP manipulation in Aether Raids strategy. As a result, Brave Lysithea continued to be thrown into the corner and forgotten in mediocrity.

Luckily, with the refinement, they fixed the weapon’s main problem by dealing 1 damage chip every turn, regardless of its HP. This ensures that Lysithea will always be able to activate the weapon’s HP condition in the player phase. HP chip damage can also be used to manipulate HP values ​​similar to Winter Bernadetta, however, Lysithea only deals chip damage to herself each turn, while Bernadetta deals chip damage to all allies within two spaces if at 100% HP. This means that HP manipulation can be done much faster with Bernadetta than with Lysithea.

Brave Lysithea, while largely lost in the context of manipulation, more than makes up for it from the perspective of combat. She follows in Leif’s footsteps by having cooldown reduction as part of her refined weapon, and she gains the ability to have pseudo-acrobatics similar to Edelgard’s in addition to cooldown acceleration . This means that Lysithea can either activate a three cooldown special like Luna or guarantee a two cooldown special like Ruptured Sky and Moonbow outside of very specific circumstances (Guard + Tempo). This can be combined with Bridal Catria for four potential consecutive attacks, alongside potentially using Tempo to ensure Guard can’t stop his special activation.

The big elephant in the room, however, is the lack of DR piercing specials for mages, as these are either locked to bows (Deadeye) or daggers (Lethality). This means its damage can potentially be walled off by Hardy Fighter and Deflect Magic, which is unfortunately a very common combination frequently used in Aether Raids Defense and Summoner Duels. At least until then, Brave Lysithea will be a great nuke in Summoner Duels Survival where there’s only one Deflect Magic seal to go around.

Brave Dmitri

Brave Dimitri essentially became an amalgamation of Spring Maria and Askr. The difference between the three units being the distance requirement; Spring Maria doesn’t need allies to be near her, Askr has a two-space unit requirement, and Dimitri has a three-space unit requirement. This means Dimitri has an easier time moving forward to do damage in the player phase without losing his weapon effect, which increases his flexibility somewhat.

Also, since Brave Dimitri comes with Blue Lion Rule, it means he has both percentage DR and flat DR in his kit. This is an extremely powerful combination, as the DR percentage covers AoEs and damage multipliers such as Glimmer and Astra, while the flat DR ensures skills such as Lethality cannot cause high damage. to Dmitri. This means that Dimitri went from being a mediocre tank with low resolution to being an excellent tank, despite having low resolution, due to the lump damage reduction. It also helps Dimitri that there is no special DR piercing percentage for mages, which means his low resolve goes largely unpunished in the current state of the game.

Brave Dimitri is also excellent against the current state of melee nukes in the game due to the multiple DR types in his kit, with Legendary Nanna being checked by his flat DR, while Brave Seliph would likely struggle to pass. by his DR percentage with Blue Lion Rule. All of these factors make Dimitri a potentially very powerful frontline unit in Summoner Duels, with plenty of potential as a melee specialist due to lack of answers for the most part.

Dimitri is not infallible; his low resolve can sometimes show his ugly head as he is potentially unable to engage in multiple magical engagements in Summoner Duels. This is especially scary if there are dragons in the field, which are increasingly common due to their increased relative strength, and they also cannot be protected by Far Saves. Dimitri, however, goes from zero to hero in Aether Raids, as his shortcomings can be largely compensated with the help of ally support. Just make sure his allies are well hidden because unlike Far Saves, Dimitri will not provide his allies with protection from enemy fire.

Courage Claude

Brave Claude, quite simply, was absolutely dysfunctional before refinement. The combination of Fatal Smoke, general lack of durability, vulnerability to Guard, and ranged fliers being absolute dev pariahs didn’t help Brave Claude’s claim. Although the last point is still unfixed at the time of writing, the remaining three points are all somewhat fixed for the most part. Fatal Smoke no longer totally ruins Claude’s day with refinement, durability is somewhat fixed with additional stats as well as first hit damage reduction, and he’s getting a Tempo effect to ensure Claude can guarantee his specials .

Its only main caveat is the absence of guaranteed preventive follow-up; he received the wrong half of Null Follow-Up as he stops follow-up negations. Since Brave Claude isn’t known for his searing firepower, that means he probably still has to be careful with guaranteed follow-up attacks unless support is provided, like Fallen Lilith with his Null Follow-Up status. , or Hilda with her weapon. provide tracking negation for allies in two spaces.

There’s also the appeal of double attacks like Bridal Catria with her Triangle attack, but that’s probably an unfair comparison for most because apart from a small minority of rather dumb units like the aforementioned Brave Dimitri. , most units are likely to struggle anyway. In most cases, Brave Claude is likely to perform admirably, and this can be extended to the entire Astra season if you are a cheater and use Elimeme.

]]>
Community Development Specialist | Planetizen Job Board https://mongegrafico.com/community-development-specialist-planetizen-job-board/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 16:29:00 +0000 https://mongegrafico.com/community-development-specialist-planetizen-job-board/ The Community Development Specialist is responsible for a wide variety of duties in support of grant administration, economic development and city planning. Under supervision, this position will implement and evaluate grant program activities; provide compliance monitoring and reporting; work closely with staff and members of outside agencies to manage grant-funded programs and projects, including the […]]]>

The Community Development Specialist is responsible for a wide variety of duties in support of grant administration, economic development and city planning. Under supervision, this position will implement and evaluate grant program activities; provide compliance monitoring and reporting; work closely with staff and members of outside agencies to manage grant-funded programs and projects, including the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program; provide support to implement economic development strategies and activities; review development applications to ensure compliance with applicable policies and regulations, act as liaison between the City and local businesses, and perform assigned related work.

The highly qualified candidate is a critical thinker who has excellent writing and presentation skills and may have a solid grounding in California general plan and zoning principles. The successful candidate has a strong background in public outreach and wants to be part of a dynamic team working to influence economic, housing and planning policies in our community. The position requires any combination of education, training and experience that would provide the knowledge and skills listed. Preferred (BUT NOT REQUIRED): College degree with a major in planning, geography, public administration, economics, business, community development or related field and/or two (2) years of full-time work experience in government or other planning experience, grants management, community/economic development or other closely related profession.

]]>