The Factory Project: Backhaus – FAD Magazine

Opening in October in a 67,000 square foot industrial space. The factory project promises to be one of the highlights of Frieze week. Over the next few weeks, FAD will be talking to the ten curatorial teams participating in the museum-wide exhibit. Below we have Jacob Barnes from Backhaus.

Can you tell us about your curatorial practice?
I would characterize Backhaus’s collective curatorial practice as a practice based practically on juxtaposition and intuition, using the thematic framework of contemporary socio-political issues. That is, we work to bring artists and works together in an original and natural way, while often doing so as a way to comment on the world around us.

Can you tell us a bit about the exhibition you will be presenting at The Factory Project?
The project is a one-piece installation, accompanied by an essay written for the occasion. One of the first things that struck me about the location was the history of sugar in the British Empire and the growth of modern capitalism. Of course, everyone experiences these things differently, so I wanted to create something that was more commemorative than didactic.

Which artists have you invited to participate in your section of The Factory Project and why did you choose them? Simple, just me, and I do it because I know exactly what I want, and as the old saying goes, if you want something done right, do it yourself!

What do you think about the hijacking of the word curator by editors, stylists, DJs, z-list celebrities, off-list celebrities, TV personalities and influencers? I think people care too much about titles. I got on this as a curator, now I’m the artist I guess, but at the end of the day I’m just a person using a platform to bring an artwork to the world. Editors, stylists, etc. can be called whatever they want – it doesn’t change my job much!

The Factory Project takes place in a very large IRL exhibition space. How do you see the presentation of your exhibition? Simply – outdoors, where people see it and can appreciate it in context. This is very site specific so location is everything.

During COVID / containment, what did you read, watch, listen to?
All about sugar!

Have there been any positive points for you about the containment? Just the opportunity to take risks, plus the complete upheaval that accompanied a new world order – lockdown allowed me to go from finishing a master’s degree with no idea what I was doing with my life to management of a magazine distributed throughout the world and now an international gallery. There are a lot of positives and negatives there, but the sheer opportunity to move forward was great.

2022, what are your plans? & do you have confidence in the future?
I have a lot of projects – where to start? I’ve gotten a little superstitious about these things recently, so I’m going to keep them close to my chest. As to whether or not I have confidence in the future, yes and no: I am confident about the work that I and those I work with will be able to do in our respective communities, but I am absolutely not confident about the future. future in a broader sense. However, these two things are closely related – I love doing work that helps and excites people, but some of that work necessarily has to be done in a world that is a very difficult, sometimes scary place.

The Factory Project is one of the biggest events held during London’s Frieze Week and will be held at Thameside Industrial Estate from October 9-22, 2021. Free tickets

The Factory Project is an independent, museum-wide exhibition to take place during London’s Frieze Week. It was launched to support emerging mid-career artists and curators and is billed as a multidisciplinary investigative project. This exhibition hosts 10 independent curators and curatorial platforms based in the UK; each producing their own exhibits at the factory’s largest site and will feature over 80 artists.

The factory project takes place in the monumental Thameside Industrial Estate, a 6,284 m2 warehouse and yard complex in North Woolwich, Newham – a short walk from London City Airport and nestled between the Tate Sugar Refinery & Lyle and the Thames Barrier – on Factory Road. It is produced by Thorp Stavri and is supported by Projekt and FAD Magazine.

Categories

Key words

  • Backhaus
  • The factory project

Author

Marc Westall

Mark Westall is the founder and editor-in-chief of FAD magazine Founder and co-editor of Art of Conversation and founder of the @worldoffad platform

Opening in October in a 67,000 square foot industrial space. The factory project promises to be one of the highlights of Frieze week. […]

Opening in October in a 67,000 square foot industrial space. The factory project promises to be one of the highlights of Frieze week. […]

Opening in October in a 67,000 square foot industrial space. The factory project promises to be one of the highlights of Frieze week. […]

Opening in October in a 67,000 square foot industrial space. The factory project promises to be one of the highlights of Frieze week. […]



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